Art and Metaphysics

bukowski 2

“Genius could be the ability to say a profound thing in a simple way, or even to say a simple thing in a simpler way.”- Charles Bukowski

In The Mathematics of the Breath and the Way, Charles Bukowski gave a refreshing view upon the art of writing, and expounded on the larger issues around literary production. In literature, that big picture means you have to extrapolate to people who are not yourself.

Alexander Nazaryan wrote in the New Yorker (November 2, 2012) “What ballet is to football players, mathematics is to writers, a discipline so beguiling and foreign, so close to a taboo, that it actually attracts a few intrepid souls by virtue of its impregnability. The few writers who have ventured headlong into high-level mathematics—Lewis Carroll, Thomas Pynchon, David Foster Wallace—have been among our most inventive in both the sentences they construct and the stories they create.”

Nowadays, there is a discernible trend in modern art to evolve towards a new fusion point with science and religion. In the visual arts, the man – machine relation is an often recurring theme.  The struggle for beauty became also be a struggle for sense. Art is not important as a work by itself, but by the way we relate to it, a relation that influences and changes our life. Art must suggest, stimulate and provoke.

The unique point where physics, mathematics and psychology converge lays, following Mulisch (+2010), in the equation 1:2 of the string length of a tune to its octave. The unique status of the harmony of an octave is only comparable with the disharmony of the paradox. The octave belongs, just like the number and the colors, to an ideal world.  Its logos isn’t visible but only audible, not in space, but in time, just like the thinking.

The contemporary unifying trend for human metaphysics is growing from the roots of society to the top instead of being dictated by philosophers or religious leaders.

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